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The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was signed into law on Wednesday, March 18, 2020.  It is the second major legislative initiative passed in the United States in response to COVID-19.

opens in a new windowFamilies First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)
The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) took effect on April 1, 2020, and provides eligible workers with paid leave for reasons related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Covered employers should post notice of the FFCRA requirements in a conspicuous place on its premises. A copy of the notification is linked below, along with a link to the U.S. Department of Labor website, which provides additional guidance on paid leave requirements related to COVID-19.

opens in a new windowDOL FFCRA Posteropens PDF file

opens in a new windowDOL FFCRA Fact Sheet

We have also provided an FFCRA Compliance Bulletin, which includes frequently asked questions issued by the DOL to assist employers and employees on their responsibilities and rights under the FFCRA, as well as a resource on the U.S. Chamber website that outlines what businesses need to know.

opens in a new windowCrane Agency – Families First Coronavirus Response Act Q&Aopens PDF file

opens in a new windowU.S. Chamber – FFCRA:  What Businesses Need to Know

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act includes two new significant paid leave laws:  (1) the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act, and (2) the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act.  Both statutes address absences from work caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Both provisions are effective April 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020.

Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA)
This act creates a new form of FMLA leave covering up to 12 weeks of an eligible employee’s inability to work or telework “due to a need for leave to care for the son or daughter under 18 years of age of such employee if the school or place of care has closed, or the child care provider of such son or daughter is unavailable, due to a public health emergency.”

Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA)
Employees covered under the EPSLA are entitled to paid leave for several different types of absences related to the COVID-19 pandemic:
– Employees subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19
– Employees who have been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine related to COVID-19
– Employees experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and are seeking a medical diagnosis
– Employees caring for an individual subject to an order described in (1) or self-quarantine as described in (2)
– An Employee caring for his or her child whose school or place of care is closed (or child care provider is unavailable) due to COVID-19 related reasons
– Employees experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Due to the speed at which these laws took effect, the U.S Department of Labor has created a Q&A page to address questions and provide additional guidance:   opens in a new windowU.S. Department of Labor – Families First Coronavirus Response Act Q&A

Please visit the opens in a new windowCrane Agency Coronavirus Preparedness Resource page for further information.  As with any rapidly changing situation, please check local, state, and federal websites for the most recent updates and guidance on this quickly evolving topic.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act)

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law on Friday, March 27, 2020, and is the most massive economic relief bill in U.S. History.  It will allocate $2.2 trillion in health care relief and emergency assistance for individuals, families, and businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic crisis.

opens in a new windowCoronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act)

The CARES Act was designed to distribute capital quickly and broadly.  The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) prioritizes millions of Americans employed by small businesses by authorizing up to $349 billion toward job retention and certain other expenses.  Small businesses and eligible nonprofit organizations, Veterans organizations, and Tribal businesses described in the Small Business Act, as well as individuals who are self-employed or are independent contractors, are eligible if they also meet program size standards. opens in a new window(1)

Below you will find links to additional information, along with a few attachments, that may help covered businesses access the other resources available through the recently passed stimulus package:

Guidance from the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship

Guidance from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Guidance from the US Department of Treasury

The CARES Act also provides support for opens in a new windowpublic transportationopens WORD file .  To find out more information, please visit the opens in a new windowFederal Transit Administration COVID-19opens WORD file landing page.

Individuals & Families

For individuals and families, $250 billion has been allocated for direct payments in the form of recovery rebates to help soften the economic challenges many are currently facing.  Recovery rebates are refundable tax credits that will be applied to 2020 tax returns but will be advanced to taxpayers now based on their 2019 or 2018 adjusted income.

How much of a rebate will I receive?

Individuals with a Social Security Number (SSN) and who are not dependents may receive $1,200 (single filers and heads of household) or $2,400 (joint filers), with an additional rebate of $500 per qualifying child, if they have adjusted gross income (AGI) under $75,000 (single), $150,000 (joint), or $112,500 (heads of household) using 2019 tax return information. (The IRS will use 2018 tax return information if the taxpayer has not yet filed for 2019.) The rebate phases out at $50 for every $1,000 of income earned above those thresholds. opens in a new window(2)

CARES Act Rebate chart

How do I get my rebate?

For most Americans, no action is required. The IRS will use data from the most current tax returns or Social Security data to provide a rebate to Americans either via direct deposit (if such information is available) or through a paper check in the mail to the last address on file.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he hopes to distribute rebates to taxpayers who e-filed with direct deposit banking information in three weeks. Taxpayers receiving rebate checks may have to wait six to eight weeks to receive a paper check in the mail.

Treasury will be developing a web-based portal for individuals to provide their banking information to the IRS online. Taxpayers will be able to receive payments immediately as opposed to checks in the mail. opens in a new window(3)

Additional information regarding Rebate Relief, Social Security, Payroll Tax Changes, and Unemployment concerning the CARES Act can be found here:

opens in a new windowTax Foundation – FAQ on Federal Cornovirus Relief Bill (CARES Act).

Provisions of the CARES Act also address healthcare needs, expand individual access to retirement accounts, support education, and provide state and local governments with additional funds to help mitigate the on-going COVID-19 crisis.